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mangalore buns recipes, traditional banana buns soft & fluffy mangalorean style #buns #mangalore
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MANGALORE BUNS RECIPE | BANANA BUNS | SOFT & FLUFFY BUNS

Mangalore Buns or Banana Buns are soft & fluffy, sweet, and delicious buns or pooris prepared using ripe bananas. Mangalore buns can be served for breakfast or as an evening snack. It is one of the best recipes that people of all age groups love. 
Course Breakfast, snacks
Cuisine Coastal Karnataka, goan, karkala, kundapur, Mangalore, Udupi
Keyword 9 days navratri vrat, banana poori, Buns, buns chutney, buns with wheat flour, fasting recipes, fried dough, hotel style, kele ka puri, No Onion No Garlic, overripe banana, Restaurant Style, upvas recipes
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings 20 buns, may vary depending on the size
Author Kushi

Ingredients

RECIPE I INGREDIENTS FOR BEST & EASY TRADITIONAL MANGALORE BUNS OR BANANA BUNS

  • 8 small ripe bananas (3 big bananas)
  • ¼ cup Sugar (you can increase it up to ⅓ cup for more sweetness)
  • ½ cup Yogurt or Curds
  • ¼ teaspoon Baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon Cumin seeds
  • ½ teaspoon Salt
  • 3 cups  All purpose flour / Maida, more for dusting
  • 1 ½ tablespoon Butter, softened
  • Oil for frying

Instructions

HOW TO MAKE BANANA BUNS OR MANGALORE BUNS DOUGH?

  • In a mixer or grinder, add bananas and sugar and blend to a smooth paste. Add this to a bowl. To this, add yogurt, baking soda, cumin seeds, salt, 2 cups of flour, butter, and mix. 
  • The dough for Mangalore buns is going to be sticky compared to other bread/poori dough. Check out the consistency of the dough here. If the dough is very sticky, add another ½ cup of flour and mix. The amount of flour will vary every single time depending on the water content in the banana, the brand of flour used, local weather conditions, etc.
  • Cover and keep it aside for 6 hours to overnight. 
  • Next morning, add the remaining half cup of flour to the dough and knead once.

HOW TO ROLL AND FRY BANANA BUNS OR MANGALORE BUNS?

  • Dust the working surface. Make lemon size balls from the dough and flatten them using a rolling pin to form buns. Do not flatten it too much. I prefer to keep it a little thick, approximately 0.5 cm. The thickness is approximately twice that of poori. Check out the video here. 
  • Heat oil in a pan on a medium flame for frying. See that at least 40 percent of your pan is filled with oil. 
  • Once the oil is hot, fry the buns on medium flame. Drop one or two buns at a time, depending on the size of the pan. Keep gently pressing them using a slotted spatula, and they will puff up nicely. For better understanding, check the video on how buns are traditionally fried. 
  • Using a slotted spatula, flip on the other side and fry till it is golden on both sides. Transfer it to a paper towel to absorb any excess oil. Repeat the process for the remaining buns.

Notes

  • Overripe and ripe bananas are the best for making these buns. 
  • Do not add any water while making the dough. Sugar, when combined with banana, gives enough moisture to form the dough.
  • The more you knead, and the more time you allow the dough to ferment, will make your buns fluffier.
  • The dough may appear dark or black after it has rested for 6 hours. This is normal and is a result of oxidation.
  • After making buns, you can place the leftover dough in the fridge and use it to make buns whenever desired.
  • The amount of sugar you add may vary depending on the sweetness of bananas and the sweetness you like. If you add more sugar, the buns will turn a little darker, but they will be really tasty.
  • Add a small piece of dough to check if the oil is hot. Check if it sizzles and comes up.
  • While frying, baste the buns with hot oil using a slotted spoon to help them puff up.
  • Do not fry the buns on high flame. It will turn the buns dark brown.
  • Read the post above for Recipe II, Mangalore buns without curds.